Recent Changes

Sunday, February 7

Wednesday, July 15

  1. page Shalosh Regalim edited ... Pessach Haggadot Shavuot Shavuot Shalosh Regalim
    ...
    Pessach
    Haggadot
    Shavuot
    Shavuot
    Shalosh Regalim
    (view changes)
    6:03 pm
  2. page Shalosh Regalim edited ... Pessach Haggadot Shavuot Shavuot Shalosh Regalim
    ...
    Pessach
    Haggadot
    Shavuot
    Shavuot
    Shalosh Regalim
    (view changes)
    5:25 pm
  3. page Yamim Noraim edited ... Al Chet Presentation - Yafa Chase The Music of Kol Nidre Petach lanu sha'ar - dvar tefillah …
    ...
    Al Chet Presentation - Yafa Chase The Music of Kol Nidre
    Petach lanu sha'ar - dvar tefillah
    Modern Piyut - Le chol Ish yesh shem
    Mareh Kohen
    in connection with the Avodah service...
    (view changes)
    5:24 pm
  4. page Yamim Noraim edited ... Hoffman Avodah service Presentation hoffman yaaleh simcha on El Nora Alila Modern Piyut -…
    ...
    Hoffman Avodah service Presentation
    hoffman yaaleh
    simcha on El Nora Alila
    Modern Piyut - Le chol Ish yesh shem
    Petach lanu sha'ar - dvar tefillah
    (view changes)
    5:24 pm
  5. page Simcha Zevit's page edited Simcha's Field Trips simcha on El Nora Alila
    Simcha's Field Trips
    simcha on El Nora Alila
    (view changes)
    5:24 pm
  6. page simcha on El Nora Alila edited El Nora Alila is a piyyut written by Moses Ibn Ezra, who lived in the 11th century. It is sung at …
    El Nora Alila is a piyyut written by Moses Ibn Ezra, who lived in the 11th century. It is sung at the beginning of N'eilah, the closing service of Yom Kippur. The piyyut begins with words "El Nora Alila; God of great deeds, the awesom one" , and the words of this first stanza, which concludes with "B'sha'at Neiliah: in the hour of the closing of the gates", are repreated again after each of the following stanzas. The melodies that I have heard are easy to pick up, and so the repetetive communal acknowlegement ( a melody that everyone will sing together is important) of the power of the God we are praying to, and the power of the moment at hand, can bring a sense of awe - nora - as we enter into this final service of Yamim Noraim. Each stanza seems to bring to a "peak" the resounding themes of day that has passed, as we:
    quiver with awe at the closing of the gates
    pour out our souls in prayer to ask for pardon
    ask to be sealed for splendor and for joy
    judged with graciousness and compassion
    remembered with the merit of our ancestors
    and returned to right relationship with our God and our people.
    The repeating refrain of "b'sh'at ha'neilah" evokes that sense of finality of the hour - the image of the gates slowly closing becomes very prominent through the piyyut, and so if it is used well, it can create a sense of both urgency and hopefulness to the final prayers that follow. As commentary in Kol Haneshema states " we have one more chance to squeeze from ourselves the last bit of impurity still in our hearts, to voice the last unspoken hope and give it power in the new year. The gates are closing, but they are not shut."
    To "extend" this piyyut - bring some of it's meaning into clear focus before singing the ancient words - I would use some modern poetry that brings out possible themes. A closing of the gates can also be about what is on the "inside" of the boundary created by the gates. The piyyut can be used to create a feeling of "we are in this final hour together", and together we can rise beyond the gates. Below is poem found in "on Wings of Awe"( with some slight modifications I have made!) that I like as a way of highlighting El Nora Alila:
    " As the light of day diminishes,
    The space for our soul expands.
    Hungry body, yearning soul
    We now approach the Neilah gates
    Of pardon, purity, and peace.
    Look around you,
    Thise who were once strangers,
    Crowding the space we thought our bodies needed
    Have now, as evening falls, become familiar
    Each narrow body spreading wings
    ON which together we may rise beyond the gates
    To join each soul to Soul
    Each little space we struggle to preserve
    to Space.
    When the shofar sounds and this exalted day withdraws behind the curtain of night
    We will no longer have the chance to lift ourselves and each other
    Into that new and holy, pure and radiant year
    For which we hunger
    A year in which we can discover in a room of strangers
    Wings to God.
    At this hour of the closing of the gates
    Let us reach through the curtain
    Together.
    This may be highlighted by having the whole community sing the refrain of the piyyut, but having certain individuals at the front of the room designated to sing each stanza.

    (view changes)
    2:13 pm
  7. page Simcha's Field Trips edited ... THe program ended with hatikvah, and a recessional of the Jewish War Veterans. We were asked t…
    ...
    THe program ended with hatikvah, and a recessional of the Jewish War Veterans. We were asked to leave in silence - no kiddush and shmoozing for this gathering - which I thought was very appropriate and a powerful way to end.
    3) PENTACOST
    I need a comparative religion class! Or perhaps just a guide sitting next to me next time I enter St. Ann's Catholic Church for Pentacost! THis is a very large and beautiful church, built in the early 1900's. I was immediately stuck by the majesty of the high ceilings, the stone columns, the stain glass windows, the tapestries portraying Jesus, Paul and Peter, and also by the "high ritual" of the processionals with robed altar boys and robed men and women carrying large crosses as the morning began.Though the beauty of the place is striking, and the church leaders and those with assigned roles in the service carry an aura of depth and solemnity, I quickly feel that there is too much empty space, not enough energy to fill it. Only those "in charge" seem to be really "in" the ritual and prayer to follow; almost everyone else seems to be spectators.
    My freind Jim is the singer for mass, and after the processional he comes forward. Before he begins, he encourages everyone to sing with him, but I quickly notice that he sings pretty much alone. He has a beautiful voice, and I know his praise is sincere, so it helps me to connect to a feeling of prayerful space despite the fact that I am somehwat lost with what is going on around me, and despite the fact that the congregation does not seem to echo his praiseful hymns.
    Pentacost in the Catholic tradition is a celebration of Christ infusing his Apostles with "gifts of the spirit". There is a reading from sciprture, and a sermon by Father Jim, in which he urges his parishioners to celebrate the spirit of God by "doing good" - by finding within themselves and each other the "inspiration to do good". He appplies his message directly to possible ways that people can serve the parish itself, as it seems that becuse of financial issues within the parish, several churches are now being combined into one community, and there is much change ahead and a need for healing. After the sermon, everyone comes forward to take the eucharist, and this part of the ritual again is a bit mysterious to me. IT does seem that everyone participates, and that there is an air of solemnity and reverence around it. The organ music is the only sound heard.
    I was surprised by how short the service was - just under an hour. When I spoke to my freind Jim afterwards, he explained: "people are anxious to get out on the golf course"! This is apparently not a crowd who will spend the rest of the day celebrating Pentacost. Jim explained that the crowd who comes to this particular service are probably the most "secular" group within the church, there is another service later that morning that will last longer, and to which more of the church regulars will come.
    The visit reminded me of the "lost potential" that is so apparent when there is not a connection between the people and what it is that they are celebrating, praying for, coming together in community to acknowlege. The beauty and richness of the buiding itself, and the emptiness that I felt inside it, became a metaphor for this lost potential.

    (view changes)
    11:45 am
  8. page Simcha's Field Trips edited SIMCHA'S FIELD TRIPS 1) BIRKAT HACHAMA IN CLEVELAND: WILL THE SUN SHINE? ... April 8th. Sha…
    SIMCHA'S FIELD TRIPS
    1) BIRKAT HACHAMA IN CLEVELAND: WILL THE SUN SHINE?
    ...
    April 8th.
    Shawn had been the driving force behind calling the Cleveland Jewish community together to do a ceremony for Birkat haChamah, and he was quickly joined by several colleagues who helped with the planning and logistics. We secured an outdoor shelter space at the JCC, and got word out through the Cleveland Board of Rabbis, flyers were distributed for synagogue bulletins, and the Cleveland Jewish news did a brief article. The gathering was called for 6:30 am, with Birkat HaChamah scheduled from 6:30 - 7:00,and a brief Shacharit service for 7:00 - 7:30. We had no idea how many people would join us - especially given the cold and snow of the days leading up to the event.
    ...
    early morning, mademade us aware
    ...
    sun for light,light, for vision,
    ...
    for warmth.
    Shawn

    Shawn
    pulled everyone
    ...
    and time.
    The order of the ceremony was as follows:
    Opening Remarks
    ...
    Chant Genesis 1:14-19
    Jeremiah 31:34
    Psalm 136:1-9 -- Hodu L’Shem
    Psalm 121: Esa Eyni
    ...
    Page 147a
    Solar Energy Remarks (Stephanie: Earth Watch Ohio)
    Shofarot
    ...
    HaHammah - “ …oseh“ …oseh ma’aseh Bereshit.”
    Sheheciyanu
    Malachi 3:20-24 (excerpted)
    Closing Music
    ...
    readers were situatedsituated in front,
    ...
    Chag Sameach.
    The expereince really held a sense of connection to tradition, to community, to all that changes ( where were we 28 years ago? where will we be 28 years from now?) and also to that which is eternal.
    2) YOM HASHOA COMMUNITY COMMEMORATION AT PARK SYNAGOGUE
    I decided to attend this for one of my "field trips", as I have never attended before. With Yom HaShoa, Yom HaZikaron, and Yom Ha'Atama'ut all in such close proximity to each other, I have always chosen to attend the community wide celebrations of the other two holidays, and not the one for Yom HaShoa. I am glad I went, and will plan on attending in the future, as the "never again" theme rings in my ears. We do need to keep the memory of the Holocaust alive in our hearts, and this commemoration did indeed open the heart of remembrance through moving rituals, and personal family stories. As Reb Sami said in class, "the key to Yom HaShoa is for survivors and/or their children to share personal stories". He also said in class, though, that it's REALLY important to keep the "needs of the kahal" in mind, and to not "over-do" it. The planners of this commemoration kept the first point in mind, but forgot the second!
    The ceremony began in a dimmed, quiet room with flags marched down the aisle by Jewish War Veterans and Kol Israel Foundation past presidents. Immediately following the this group which consisted of old men, came a "march of the generations", with children of all ages coming down the aisles holding candles. The juxtaposition of the ages was a powerful reminder that young and old alike are impacted by the Holocaust. Rabbi JOsh Skoff then spoke a moving welcome and introduction to the evening, in which he spoke directly to the survivors in the room. He spoke of their stories as modern haggadot, linking us once again to the Jewish move from slavery to freedom. Following his remarks, an amazing children's choir sang several pieces, ending with Eli, Eli, and the room held a deep silence for several moments after they finished.
    The next section of the program involved six stories of survivors and their families, with either the survivors themselves or a family representative lighting a memorial candle at the front of the room, and then speaking some of their family story. After each speaker, the entire rest of the family that was present would come up on the bimah and remain there until all six stories had been told. By the end of the sixth story, the bimah was filled with all ages: a living testament that the suffering of the survivors has not been without meaning, and that their courage and faith lives on.
    If I were involved in the creation of this ritual, we would have concluded this section with the original Holocaust poems that were later shared by students, and then moved into the liturgical pieces of El Malei Rachamim and Kaddish, followed by Hatikvah, and then concluding. The ceremony had already been going on for almost an hour. Just as I was feeling open-hearted and prayerful, though, I realized that we were about half way through the event!
    We continued on with a whole new section of the program that was a commemoration for the 50th anniversary of the Kol Israel Foundation, an organization that was founded by Cleveland area holocaust survivors and their families in 1959 to secure education, guidance, vocational training, and social and economic adjustment for survivors who had settled in this area. A video was shown telling the life story of some of the founding members, and tracing the history and growth of the organization. The theme was "the last sixty years of making new lives in America". While this was a moving piece, and directly related to Yom HaShoa, I felt that it needed to either be the main portion of the program, or shared on another occasion. As an addition to what had already come before it, it was much to long, and therefore had me and others stirring in out seats and waiting for it to be over! I only stayed because the liturgical pieces had not yet happened, and I wanted to be present for them. However, the emotional connection that had been achieved in the first half of the program was lost by the time it was time for El Malei, and Kaddish.
    THe program ended with hatikvah, and a recessional of the Jewish War Veterans. We were asked to leave in silence - no kiddush and shmoozing for this gathering - which I thought was very appropriate and a powerful way to end.
    3) PENTACOST

    (view changes)
    11:01 am

Friday, June 26

  1. page Cindy Freedman edited ... seder Cindy Field Trips Shavuot
    ...
    seder
    Cindy Field Trips
    Shavuot
    (view changes)
    7:04 am

More